Good Samaritan Uses ResQLink for Medical Emergency

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Good Samaritan Uses ResQLink for Medical Emergency

Good Samaritan Uses ResQLink for Medical Emergency
Lives saved

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Hiking

Hiking

Mountain

Mountain

Medical emergency

Medical emergency

Normal conditions

Normal conditions

Hiking

Good Samaritan Uses ResQLink for Medical Emergency

-39.1501179°S, 175.8929637°E

Posted on November 3, 2022 by Hugo

What happened?

This was meant to be a quick day walk up on the exposed Kaimanawa Tops overlooking the majestic snow capped Mt. Ruapehu, Ngauruhoe, and Tongariro. The winter weather was absolutely perfect, clear skies, the views gorgeous, but cold above the bush line. 

After following the Umukarikari Track to its peak I stayed for a while capturing some great photos. As soon as I left the top, I felt something was not quite right. Real shortness of breath, strange tingling and numb lower arms to fingers, mild tightness across the chest, racing heart, and dizziness. After a little more extreme slow walking/shuffling, and not sure whether to try to return to the start of the track over exposed terrain or carry on to a hut with possibly worse cell reception, it worried me there was no one around and I was really alone.

 Through poor cell reception, Healthline and Ambulance services tried to help me identify the exact location, but a confused brain didn’t help. Putting on all of my gear preparing to wait for help but getting cold quickly, it was then my savior arrived – a mountain runner carrying a ACR PLB and an emergency blanket!

Although I really didn’t want to put others out, the PLB was activated and from that point on, the whole rescue process swung into action. And the stress of wondering how I was going to get back down safely should things get worse, gratefully dropped away. It was a relief.

While waiting for the helicopter, two experienced trampers waited with me, both also well equipped with PLBs, and I realised my “fast and light” walking style had drawbacks.

The rescue team arrived from Hawkes Bay, luckily the terrain was perfect for helicopter landing, and were amazing. Professional, understanding, helpful – experiences like this make one really appreciate the effort that goes into providing such a service. Destination was Wellington Hospital given the likely cardiac cause & fortunately no cardiac damage was detected.

“Better safe than sorry”, lessons learnt.

Words of wisdom

Always carry a PLB, even if on a short walk, accidents happen. Not only can you help yourself but be of immediate assistance to others.

Thank you note

A big thank you to everyone that helped me on that day, from the mountain runner who lent me his gear, the awesome SAR helicopter team, kind trampers. And the ACR team for the device that made getting out safely and quickly possible. Humbling.

Rescue location

Umukarikari Track, Waikato, New Zealand

Rescue team

Good Samaritan

ResQLink™ 400

Go to product details

$369.95

Small but resilient, the ResQLink 400 has been professionally engineered and tested to ensure it can withstand even the harshest elements. This buoyant Personal Locator Beacon requires no subscription for use and can be utilized to enhance your safety in a wide variety of environments. Whether on land, at sea, or in the air, trust that the ResQLink’s satellite precision and military durability, put rescue in the palm of your hands.

 

Features and Benefits:

  • No Subscription Required
  • GPS and Galileo GNSS
  • Built-In Buoyancy
  • Strobe and Infrared Strobe
  • Global Coverage
  • MEOSAR Compatible
  • Small and lightweight
  • 5-year battery life
  • 24+ hours Operational Life**
  • Multi-function Clip System Included
**Based on test report from an accredited laboratory   WARNING: PROP 65   
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