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    Our <br/>survivor<br/> stories
     
    Maroon Bells, Colorado, USA
    Climbing
    39.0708°N, 106.989°W
     
     
    Our
    survivor
    stories
    Maroon Bells, Colorado, USA
    Climbing
    39.0708°N, 106.989°W

    Resqlink  plb front view

    ResQLink™+

    2881
    Shop Now
    Survivor
    PATRICK
    Rescued By
    Local Search and Rescue
    Date Of Rescue
    2018-07-20

    Lives saved

    3
    Adults

    Activity

    Climbing

    Terrain

    Mountain

    Issue

    Lost

    What happened?

     

    We were attempting the Maroon Bells traverse. After getting unsure of the terrain we turned around just before the third spire of the route. In an attempt to get off the mountain before dark we decided to take the Bell Cord Couloir route which we believed would have melted out by this time of the year. About half way down we encountered the snow field which had not melted out yet. While traversing across the snowfield a rock from above came down the gully and hit one of my my climbing partner's wrist, breaking it. He was able to get to a flat spot above the gully. 

    My other partner traversed lower on the snowfield where there was less snow. I went ahead and started traversing to where my partner who had broken his wrist was. Half way across, the snow I was on gave way sending me tumbling uncontrollably down the gully. My climbing  partner who was traversing lower was able to somehow catch and stop me from continuing to fall down the gully, most likely to my death. 

    From there we were able to make it to the flat spot above the gully where I activated my beacon. This allowed Mountain Rescue Aspen and The Colorado National Guard to locate us and provide a helicopter rescue. 


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    Words of Wisdom

     
    This is the toughest range in Colorado. In the Elks there are no shortcuts. 

    Thank you note to ACR

     

    Thank you for your amazing design in your product. It allowed the rescuers to figure out exactly where we where on the peak.  

    Rescue Location

     

    Next story

    Orange Beach, AL, USA, Boating


    ResQLink™+

    2881

    Buoyant Personal Locator Beacon

    It may be small, but it's tough. The ResQLink™+ Personal Locator Beacon (PLB) is a buoyant, GPS-enabled rescue beacon that's suited for outdoor adventures of all sizes (think: everything from hiking and cycling to hunting and fishing). Should you run into an unexpected survival situation, the ResQLink+ PLB will relay your location to a network of search and rescue satellites, allowing local first responders to more easily get you home safe and sound. Be Prepared for the Unpredictable

     

    • Buoyant
    • LED strobe light
    • Self Test
    • 66 Channel GPS
    • Easy emergency activation
    • Antenna clip

     

    WARNING: PROP 65

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