Cross out alt
  • Right chevron
    • English (US) Checkbox full
    • Español Checkbox empty
    • Français (FR) Checkbox empty

     

    Checkout arrow left
    Back to
    survivor
    stories
    Our <br/>survivor<br/> stories
     
    Bank's Peninsula, NZ
    Fishing
    43.75°S, 173°E
     
     
    Our
    survivor
    stories
    Bank's Peninsula, NZ
    Fishing
    43.75°S, 173°E

    Resqlink  plb front view

    ResQLink™+

    2881
    Shop Now
    Survivor
    Jeremiah
    Rescued By
    Other (Please Specify)
    Date Of Rescue
    2018-11-13

    Lives saved

    2
    Adults

    Activity

    Fishing

    Terrain

    Ocean

    Weather

    rogue wave

    Issue

    Crash Or Collision

    What happened?

     
    The day before my friend's 40th birthday we headed out to do some fishing on a kayak on the Bank's Peninsula,NZ. The weather was warm and the sea was calm. With only a couple of hours of light left for the day we kayaked/fished for an hour before turning around to head back to the beach. Shortly into our return trip a strong southwest front came, turning the sea into spray with strong winds that tipped both of us out of the kayak. We were forced onto a rocky low tide beach,pummeled by the waves as we were pushed into the rocks. We were able to drag our kayak up on one of the only sections of rocks below the 100 meter vertical cliffs with a small area above the high tide. Thankfully we didn't sustain any injury and agreed to try and walk out along the base of the cliff before it turned dark. However, we were only able to go a short distance before the beach disappeared and the ocean was crashing into the cliffs with no space to walk. It was getting dark and there was no way to walk out, the sea was still fierce with waves crashing in, making it impossible to get back out in the kayak. We accepted that we will not be getting home that evening and prepared a rock shelter at the base of the cliff above the high water mark. We had prepared a rock shelter/windbreak adjoining a overhanging rock above the high tide zone,and had crawled under the rock to shelter from the wind for the night. The air temperature was dropping fast as it became dark, we were beginning to shiver from being drenched. We were doing jumping jacks trying to stay warm, in between huddling together in the shelter. Being wet, we knew hypothermia was beginning, and we had another 10 hrs before daylight,with the low temperature for the night predicted to be 5 deg.C. We knew we would be extremely hypothermic if we were to try to "tough" it through the night. Having an ACR ResQlink PLB, we decided it was time to ask for help. The strobe light activated and we waited for rescue, surrounded by inquisitive seals. One seal even knocked the PLB off the rock as we waited for a rescue in our shelter! Within an hour a rescue helicopter appeared above and skilfully lowered a rescue member to the base of the cliff. We were both winched to safety and returned to the bay where we were staying, to get warm and get some food. Without the beacon we would have been in for a long cold night without shelter or warmth, and would have been extremely hypothermic by morning. We were only going out for a short kayak and so glad we had the beacon with us.An amazing piece of kit.

    9fe9c02cdfd7f3af2fdeaa92ecb49726
    9fe9c02cdfd7f3af2fdeaa92ecb49726


    Words of Wisdom

     
    We were only going out for a short kayak and so glad we had the beacon with us.An amazing piece of kit.

    Thank you note to ACR

     

    Rescue Location

     

    Next story

    Richmond Range, Nelson, NZ, Hiking


    ResQLink™+

    2881

    Buoyant Personal Locator Beacon

    It may be small, but it's tough. The ResQLink™+ Personal Locator Beacon (PLB) is a buoyant, GPS-enabled rescue beacon that's suited for outdoor adventures of all sizes (think: everything from hiking and cycling to hunting and fishing). Should you run into an unexpected survival situation, the ResQLink+ PLB will relay your location to a network of search and rescue satellites, allowing local first responders to more easily get you home safe and sound. Be Prepared for the Unpredictable

     

    • Buoyant
    • LED strobe light
    • Self Test
    • 66 Channel GPS
    • Easy emergency activation
    • Antenna clip

     

    WARNING: PROP 65

    Our survivor stories

    B79beb89a2c4ecef1d235122f06f25f1

    Nelson Cave NZ

    View full story Pdetail survivor arrow icn

    31ff0ffa299f099e6fd76dab399f2142

    Atlantic Ocean, USA

    View full story Pdetail survivor arrow icn

    Surv news icn

    THE NEWS

    A Boater's Guide To Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs)

    A quick guide on...

    Home news arrow
    Florida Boaters with EPIRBs and PLBs to Receive Discounts on Vessel Registration Fees

    Learn how the ...

    Home news arrow
    How the Cospas-Sarsat Search and Rescue System Works with EPIRB, Personal Locator Beacons, and ELTs

    Quietly flying above...

    Home news arrow
    Arrow right
    Arrow right

    Your cart

    Your cart

     

    0 items

    Your cart is empty

    Subtotal