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    Our <br/>survivor<br/> stories
     
    Port Fairy
    Boating
    38.381°S, 142.2293°E
     
     
    Our
    survivor
    stories
    Port Fairy
    Boating
    38.381°S, 142.2293°E

    Survivor
    Jeff
    Rescued By
    Other (Please Specify)
    Date Of Rescue
    2012-04-06
    Globalfix pro epirb front view

    GlobalFix™ PRO

    2842, 2844
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    Lives saved

    34
    Adults

    Activity

    Boating

    Terrain

    Ocean

    Weather

    rogue wave

    Issue

    Weather

     

    Boat Sinking

    What happened?

     

    The Melbourne to Port Fairy yacht race is a 135nm race through Bass Strait and into the Southern Ocean - as the season turns from Summer to the Winter storms. In 2012, with the forecast for mild north winds and a SW change, the fleet set off - the yacht Inception, a Beneteau 50 amongst the fleet with many of the crew heading to their home town of Port Fairy. When an un-forecast second front hit the fleet on the evening of Good Friday, the fleet was in dis-array. With winds gusting beyond 65 knots and waves recorded at more than 14 m (45-50 feet) the fleet were in survival mode.


    On board the yacht Inception, things took a rapid turn for the worst. With the loss of the life raft, and then the rapid development of a large source of flooding, the crew were forced into the malestrom, in the PFDs alone. Tethered together they armed their ACR ResQlink PLBs (and the boat EPIRB) - providing GPS locations to the rescue authorities and the rescue vessel - a fellow competitor. Without their PLBs, it is reasonable to expect that the crew would have been left to survive the storm until daylight some 6 hours later.


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    7249b4fe9fd8132523e946147e83ef98


    Words of Wisdom

     
    Without the PLBs, it is reasonable to expect that the crew would have been left to survive the storm until daylight some 6 hours later.

    Thank you note to ACR

     

    Thank you ACR!

    Rescue Location

     

    GlobalFix™ PRO

    2842, 2844

    Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB)

    #StaySafeOutThere with the GlobalFix™ PRO Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB). This beacon is equipped with an internal GPS that quickly and accurately relays your position to a worldwide network of search and rescue satellites, should you run into a boat emergency. Have peace of mind every time you head offshore knowing that the GlobalFix PRO EPIRB consistently takes the ‘search’ out of ‘search and rescue’.

     

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