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    Elk mountains , Colorado
    Hiking
    39.0972°N, 107.0367°W
     
     
    Our
    survivor
    stories
    Elk mountains , Colorado
    Hiking
    39.0972°N, 107.0367°W

    Survivor
    Justin
    Rescued By
    Other (Please Specify)
    Date Of Rescue
    2014-09-14
    Resqlink  plb front view

    ResQLink™+

    2881
    Shop Now

    Lives saved

    1
    Adults

    Activity

    Hiking

    Terrain

    Mountain

    Weather

    Snow

    Issue

    Medical Emergency

    What happened?

     

    On Sunday, Sept. 14th 2014, at approximately 2 pm, one of my climbing partners fell approximately 300 feet down a loose gully after the rock he was climbing on near Capitol peak in the Elk mountains crumbled underneath him. When I found out that he was hurt (broken arm and severe lacerations), my first step was to activate my ACR beacon. 


    After activating the beacon, I found a safe route to get to him without setting off any addition rockfall, and moved him to the side of the gully where it was safer. Once in the safer zone, I used my WFR skills to stop the heavy bleeding from his head (his helmet was crushed), splint his broken left arm with my trekking poles, and bandage up his bleeding right hand and his legs. 


    After stopping most of the bleeding, another responder and I helped him move out of the gully to the ridge top. The other responder had communicated via cell phone with SAR, and in less than 2.5 hours from the initial fall, a Blackhawk helicopter from the HAATS base in gypsum, Colorado was able to pick him up and transport him to the hospital, where he underwent 3 hours of surgery on his wounds.


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    B78608b2e672391e49d88ce30bdab6fc


    Words of Wisdom

     

    When I found out that he was hurt (broken arm and severe lacerations), my first step was to activate my ACR beacon. 

    Thank you note to ACR

     

    Thank you ACR.

    Rescue Location

     

    ResQLink™+

    2881

    Buoyant Personal Locator Beacon

    It may be small, but it's tough. The ResQLink™+ Personal Locator Beacon (PLB) is a buoyant, GPS-enabled rescue beacon that's suited for outdoor adventures of all sizes (think: everything from hiking and cycling to hunting and fishing). Should you run into an unexpected survival situation, the ResQLink+ PLB will relay your location to a network of search and rescue satellites, allowing local first responders to more easily get you home safe and sound. Be Prepared for the Unpredictable

     

    • Buoyant
    • LED strobe light
    • Self Test
    • 66 Channel GPS
    • Easy emergency activation
    • Antenna clip

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