Cross out alt
  • Right chevron
    • English (US) Checkbox full
    • Español Checkbox empty
    • Français (FR) Checkbox empty

     

    Checkout arrow left
    Back to
    survivor
    stories
    Our <br/>survivor<br/> stories
     
    Cuba
    Boating
    21.5218°N, 77.7812°W
     
     
    Our
    survivor
    stories
    Cuba
    Boating
    21.5218°N, 77.7812°W

    Survivor
    Michael
    Rescued By
    Coastguard
    Date Of Rescue
    2012-01-11
    Globalfix pro epirb front view

    GlobalFix™ PRO

    2842, 2844
    Shop Now

    Lives saved

    1
    Adults

    Activity

    Boating

    Terrain

    Ocean

    Weather

    rogue wave

    Issue

    Weather

     

    Boat Sinking

     

    Mechanical Failure

    What happened?

     

    My 32 foot sloop, Gypsy Moon, lost the headsail halyard when it parted at the top of the mast during a solo sail from the Dominican Republic in the Windward Passage, two days out from Puerto Plata. 


    I was no longer able to keep an upwind heading and began drifting toward Cuba. I attempted to return to port, but the waves were too high at 8-10 feet with approx. 25-30 knots of wind to make headway. I elected to proceed to Port au Prince in Haiti, approx. 175 miles away. En route, the boat was lifted by a rogue wave, became airborne, and crashed on its beam end. The motor mounts on the inboard diesel shifted and sheared, totaling an old engine and rendering the boat without engine power, with the prop shaft jammed up against the stern tube. 


    I suffered a mild head injury in the knockdown. The boat was drifting on the open ocean and yawing badly. I activated the EPIRB and was picked up about two hours later by the USCG Cutter Mohawk, which had lost one of its engines in rescuing a Haitian fishing boat and was headed to Gitmo for repairs. They insisted that I had to abandon the boat if I was to accept the rescue. The Gypsy Moon was abandoned at sea, and I made it to Gitmo, where I caught a flight home. I wrote a book about the voyage, Once Upon A Gypsy Moon, and I used the publisher's advance to buy another (heavier) boat, a 1965 Allied Seawind Ketch.


    E65cdd2752bf6c97331431e6446e3697
    Gettyimages 494426236


    Words of Wisdom

     
    It's smooth sailing until you get hit with the unexpected. Be prepared!

    Thank you note to ACR

     

    Thank you ACR!

    Rescue Location

     

    GlobalFix™ PRO

    2842, 2844

    Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB)

    #StaySafeOutThere with the GlobalFix™ PRO Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB). This beacon is equipped with an internal GPS that quickly and accurately relays your position to a worldwide network of search and rescue satellites, should you run into a boat emergency. Have peace of mind every time you head offshore knowing that the GlobalFix PRO EPIRB consistently takes the ‘search’ out of ‘search and rescue’.

     

    Our survivor stories

    E8e090ba930db963b1a9de7a399ae2b0

    Cape Canaveral, FL, USA

    View full story Pdetail survivor arrow icn

    2a430c9434cd32c7bff6c8e86b8022b5

    Access Road 6227, Cañon City, Colorado, USA

    View full story Pdetail survivor arrow icn

    Surv news icn

    THE NEWS

    A Boater's Guide To Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs)

    A quick guide on...

    Home news arrow
    Florida Boaters with EPIRBs and PLBs to Receive Discounts on Vessel Registration Fees

    Learn how the ...

    Home news arrow
    How the Cospas-Sarsat Search and Rescue System Works with EPIRB, Personal Locator Beacons, and ELTs

    Quietly flying above...

    Home news arrow
    Arrow right
    Arrow right

    Your cart

    Your cart

     

    0 items

    Your cart is empty

    Subtotal