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    Mt Whitney
    Hiking
    36.5785°N, 118.2923°W
     
     
    Our
    survivor
    stories
    Mt Whitney
    Hiking
    36.5785°N, 118.2923°W

    Survivor
    Anonymous
    Rescued By
    Local Search and Rescue
    Date Of Rescue
    2015-07-29
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    ResQLink™+

    2881
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    Lives saved

    1
    Adults

    Activity

    Hiking

    Terrain

    Mountain

    Issue

    Medical Emergency

    What happened?

     

    Saturday 25 July: Departed Cottonwood Trailhead (approx. 10,000 feet) Sunday and Monday: Hiked as high as 12,000 feet. Monday: Scout developed signs of altitude sickness on Monday at approx. 10,000 feet Tuesday: Scout and his father skipped the Mt. Whitney climb on Tuesday in hopes scout would get better by remaining at lower altitude. Wednesday: Scout was worse and couldn't hike more than a mile. Scout’s primary problem was his inability to take breaths without pain in his lungs. It was 30 miles to the trailhead and we needed to climb UP 1,000 more feet twice to get out. 


    1PM: Assistant Scoutmaster (ASM), a retired Coast Guard Captain, called Coast Guard (CG) Rescue Coordination Center in Alameda, CA (which covers all of California) on Satellite phone. CG referred us to California Office of Emergency Services (CA OES), whose area we were in. ASM passed GPS Position and all information about patient (age, condition, symptoms, vital signs, and our diagnosis (High Altitude Pulmonary Edema) CA OES asked us to activate our Personal Locator Beacon to confirm position CA OES said Sequoia National Park (SNP) would respond and a medevac helo was on standby.


     3PM: SNP sent a wonderful SNP Park Ranger on foot, who placed patient on O2 and concurred with our diagnosis and need for MEDEVAC. Called for MEDEVAC helo. Ranger put patient on O2 3:30 PM: SNP medevac helo arrived with terrific paramedic and flight crewmember Put patient on IV and administered 2 medications prescribed by MD 5:00 PM: SNP medevac helo flew patient scout and his father to Inyo Hospital in Lone Pine, CA. Hospital did tests and concurred with our diagnosis Patient released after several hours and fine once at lower altitude


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    Words of Wisdom

     
    This is my 3rd ACR PLB, as I've replaced them as the batteries have expired, and each is smaller, lighter, and better than the rest.

    Thank you note to ACR

     

    Thank you ACR!

    Rescue Location

     

    ResQLink™+

    2881

    Buoyant Personal Locator Beacon

    It may be small, but it's tough. The ResQLink™+ Personal Locator Beacon (PLB) is a buoyant, GPS-enabled rescue beacon that's suited for outdoor adventures of all sizes (think: everything from hiking and cycling to hunting and fishing). Should you run into an unexpected survival situation, the ResQLink+ PLB will relay your location to a network of search and rescue satellites, allowing local first responders to more easily get you home safe and sound. Be Prepared for the Unpredictable

     

    • Buoyant
    • LED strobe light
    • Self Test
    • 66 Channel GPS
    • Easy emergency activation
    • Antenna clip

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